Call to schedule an appointment or house call

Local : 617-379-0022

Toll Free : 866-591-4451

View Our Practice Areas

Long Term Care Planning Archives

Future health care planning essential for Massachusetts residents

Americans are living longer than ever before. In fact, the average age of the population is on the rise, which makes future health care planning essential for everyone, including Massachusetts residents. One source indicates that when an individual reaches the age of 65, the probability of needing long-term care increases to 70 percent.

Preempting family disputes with estate planning

Many people in Massachusetts are aware that Casey Kasem's death was surrounded by controversy, and some say it may be in large part due to his failure to have a proper estate plan. When one party to a second marriage has adult children and marries someone within their children's age range, careful estate planning can help preempt future confrontations. Sitting everyone down and explaining how assets will be distributed in the event of the older spouse's death may put everyone's mind at ease.

Proposed regulations may help with long-term health care planning

The population of our country is aging. As such, long-term health care planning -- including insurance policies to cover nursing home and assisted living costs -- becomes increasingly important. The state of Massachusetts is considering regulatory changes to the long-term health care insurance industry in the state in an attempt to provide protections for consumers.

Cohabitation can make estate planning even more important

Many older adults in Massachusetts are foregoing the marriage vows and living together. This may provide some advantages to many couples, but when it comes to what happens if one party becomes incapacitated or dies, it can be problematic. Cohabitation makes estate planning even more important in order to protect the surviving party.

Advance directives do not always work, ask Casey Kasem's family

As many Massachusetts residents are aware, Casey Kasem lent his voice to both television and radio for decades. Now, he is lying in an out-of-state hospital dying, and his family is fighting over how it will happen despite the fact that he signed an advance directive in 2007. His dilemma illustrates how sometimes families end up in court despite their loved ones having advance directives.

More people need to consider long-term health care planning

As the population of the United States gets older, planning for retirement may not be enough. Massachusetts residents may want to consider long-term health care planning as well. Putting a plan in place to pay for the possibility of a need to be moved to an assisted living center or nursing home can provide an individual and his or her family with options they may not otherwise have when the time comes.

Need for Massachusetts long-term health care planning on the rise

A recent study indicates that nearly 70 percent of all Americans age 65 will need some sort of long-term care. The level of care needed depends on many factors, but once that level is determined, finances often dictate from where that care will come. Long-term health care planning can give Massachusetts residents more options when the time arrives.

Preparing the cornerstone of estate planning -- the will

Contemplating mortality is not something most Massachusetts residents like to do. Even though logical people realize they are not going to live forever, death may still seem like a distant possibility. Therefore, many people fail to take care of their estate planning needs -- including the drafting and executing of a will.

Changing beneficiary designations is part of estate planning

Many Massachusetts residents with retirement accounts such as IRAs and other accounts that pass outside of a will probably filled out a beneficiary designation form when the account was first established. Depending on how long ago that was and what has gone on in their lives since, those designations may be out of date. An integral part of estate planning is ensuring the person set to inherit those accounts is still the one the account holder wants to receive them.

Long-term health care planning provides peace of mind for family

Nearly 70 percent of Americans age 65 and older expect to require at least some form of long-term care. However, many people, including some here in Massachusetts, fail to prepare for it. Long-term health care planning can provide peace of mind for both the individual and his or her family.

CONTACT THE FIRM