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Even disorganized people need wills

Many Massachusetts residents may not consider themselves the most organized people. For now, their disarray may not cause them much issue, but in the event of their deaths, disorganization could cause a significant number of issues for family members. Because of this possibility, it is often wise for even the most disorganized people to attempt to get their wills and other estate planning documents in order.

Parents in particular often find themselves getting pulled in numerous directions. As a result, they may forget appointments, misplace items and have little time for themselves. However, having children makes organizing through estate planning even more vital. Parents can use their wills to name guardians for their kids in the event of death or incapacitation. Some people may not think naming a formal guardian is necessary because they have several loved ones who could willingly care for their children, but without a specific appointment, surviving family may end up fighting over guardianship.

Wills are also important for putting someone in charge of settling the estate. This person will take on the role of executor and will have to carry out administrative duties associated with probate and closing the estate. The court will appoint a personal representative if a person does not do so in his or her will, but the court-appointed person may not be the most desired party for the role.

Even for the most disorganized of people, wills can be important documents to create. Without any type of instruction left behind, surviving family members can face complications when it comes to closing the estate and handling other remaining matters. Massachusetts residents may want to gain more information on their estate planning options to find the best ways to organize their wishes.

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