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How dementia can impact your family’s estate planning

On Behalf of | May 27, 2022 | Estate Planning

There can be lots of things to be on the lookout for when it comes to your parents and what happens to them as they age. This can be especially true when it comes to things like dementia.

If an elder in your family has dementia or shows some signs, you may wonder how that will impact their estate planning. Here are some things that it can be beneficial to keep in mind.

How dementia can impact planning

If a parent or other elder in the family has dementia, you may wonder if they will be able to make changes to their will or continue with estate planning. The reality is that in many cases they will still be able to make changes as long as they have testamentary capacity, which means simply that they understand what they are signing.

Signs of dementia

While your parent can still make changes as long as they understand the implications of what they are doing, it can be beneficial to know the signs of dementia to look out for. For example, dementia can cause frequent forgetfulness, to the point that your loved one may forget who their family members are. another sign of dementia is frequent mood changes. Those suffering from dementia may not be able to control moods as well as they used to.

Estate planning can be difficult at times, and it can be even more so if your parent or loved one has dementia. By understanding the signs and how it could impact your family, you can help ensure that your estate planning goes as smoothly as possible.

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