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What to consider when making a will

For some, writing a will can be a daunting yet necessary task and can lead to several unanswered questions. A person might be unfamiliar with where to begin and also, what to include in the will and how the process will evolve over time. All of these are important things to consider and that is why every person must be aware of the process and implications of writing a will.

Things to consider:

A person who is writing a will is called the testator and he or she should be aware of the following set of information, which will likely have a huge impact on the will itself. It is important to get in touch with an attorney to include the appropriate requirements to make the will valid, such as being 18 years or older, having the capacity to write a will, making sure that there are the necessary witnesses, and have the will signed. It is also important to value who will be the executor once the will is to be enforced.

It is also important to know if there will be any bequests, meaning if there is any specific piece of property that will be awarded to someone in particular. Another thing to consider is to whom will receive the remainder of the estate and, if it is shared with more than one person, how will it be divided.

If the testator has any children, it is important for them to consider who will be their guardian. In most cases, it is the surviving parent that will take care of them but, supposing that the other is also absent, the testator should establish a guardianship.

Writing a will can be an overwhelming task and there might seem to be a lot of things to consider but, with the right guidance and information, the testator will likely have a legally valid will.

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