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Posts tagged "assisted living"

Estate planning can help pay for long-term care

Health care costs are not the only expenses that continue to rise. The cost of long-term health care is also increasing. Massachusetts residents who include the possibility of needing extended care during estate planning could have the funds available when the time comes.

Long-term health care planning options for Massachusetts elders

Medical advancements are allowing people to live longer. This means that as many as 70 percent of people over the age of 65 will need medical care for a longer period of time than in the past. Long-term health care planning could help pay for that care. Whether a Massachusetts resident is looking to save for themselves, a spouse or elderly parents, he or she has several options from which to choose.

Long-term health care planning is a larger issue for women

Statistics show that men live an average of five years less than women do. As a result, many women will spend more time in long-term care at the end of their lives than men will. Therefore, long-term health care planning is more of an issue for Massachusetts women than men.

Future health care planning essential for Massachusetts residents

Americans are living longer than ever before. In fact, the average age of the population is on the rise, which makes future health care planning essential for everyone, including Massachusetts residents. One source indicates that when an individual reaches the age of 65, the probability of needing long-term care increases to 70 percent.

Proposed regulations may help with long-term health care planning

The population of our country is aging. As such, long-term health care planning -- including insurance policies to cover nursing home and assisted living costs -- becomes increasingly important. The state of Massachusetts is considering regulatory changes to the long-term health care insurance industry in the state in an attempt to provide protections for consumers.

More people need to consider long-term health care planning

As the population of the United States gets older, planning for retirement may not be enough. Massachusetts residents may want to consider long-term health care planning as well. Putting a plan in place to pay for the possibility of a need to be moved to an assisted living center or nursing home can provide an individual and his or her family with options they may not otherwise have when the time comes.

Need for Massachusetts long-term health care planning on the rise

A recent study indicates that nearly 70 percent of all Americans age 65 will need some sort of long-term care. The level of care needed depends on many factors, but once that level is determined, finances often dictate from where that care will come. Long-term health care planning can give Massachusetts residents more options when the time arrives.

The necessity for health care planning illustrated by new numbers

For the first time, the federal government has collected information regarding individuals who receive some level of paid long-term care. The numbers do not include aging relatives cared for by family members. The figures corroborate that the need for long-term health care planning is clear.

Rising insurance rates in Mass. will affect health care planning

Fears are abounding that more and more seniors will have trouble affording their long-term care, according to experts. Rising long-term care insurance rates in Massachusetts mean that health care planning has become more complicated for the state's elderly population. Coverage for nursing homes, assisted living and other health support continues to rise in price.

Health care planning could prove burdensome in Massachusetts

When a Massachusetts resident thinks about long-term care, he or she likely takes Medicare or Medicaid into consideration. Unfortunately, many Americans don't know that Medicare will not pay for nursing home stays or assisted living. The same is true for day-to-day eldercare -- and many families end up depleting their savings in order to cover the costs of this type of care for a loved one prior to his or her death. These facts make it all the more apparent that health care planning for the latter years of life should be an important component of the estate planning process.

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